Sale!

J.S.S 1: THIRD TERM LESSON NOTE/SCHEME OF WORK (ENGLISH LANGUAGE)

1,000.00

Category:

Description

READ PREVIEW BELOW…

 

 

JSSC1 – English Language (TERM-O3) ENL WK1
Reading and Answering Specific Questions

Reading and Answering Specific Questions that Require Conclusions to be drawn

Virtually all reading comprehension passages require that you answer specific questions. The following are tips that will be helpful in reading to answer specific questions.

  1. Read the question first. Why? Because it saves precious time to know what exactly you are reading for. You may need to re-read
  2. Understand the question. Is the information required facts or opinion? You need to know the kind of information
  3. Double-check your answer by scanning the passage again and
  4. Most questions are specific to the passage. Limit your answer to the information provided in the passage. Avoid personal knowledge except where you are asked to suggest or
  5. The following are the types of questions you should expect in most reading comprehension examinations.
    1. Literal Questions: These types of comprehension questions ask what is actually stated in the passage – facts, details, true or false questions, multiple-choice and fill-in-the- blank questions. Literal questions generally ask what, when, where, how, why events take place and who are They may also require students to compare and contrast.
    2. Interpretation Questions: These questions ask what is implied or meant, rather than what is actually stated. In answering them, you will need to:
      • Draw inferences
      • Tap into prior knowledge or
      • Make educated guesses
    3. Applied Questions: These questions expect a reader to take what was said (literal), what was meant by what was said (interpretation) and then extend (apply) the ideas beyond the situation described in the passage. It often involves analysing information and applying it to other

 

Tenses (Present)

Verbs always say something about the subject of the sentence. In addition, verbs relate the action of the subject to a specific time through the grammatical device known as tense. It is through your use of the correct tense in your speech or writing that your reader or listener can tell when the action you are talking about took place.

Tense expresses:

  • The difference between present time and past
  • The difference between real and unreal

Verb Tense

 

Tense is the term used to describe the form taken by a verb to indicate the time an action was done. Examples:

  • Present simples tense: Talks, talk, am, is, are
  • Past simple tense: Talked, was, were

The simple present tense

When you want to say that someone does something regularly, something happens regularly or something goes on all the time. Examples: My mother cooks jollof rice every Sunday.

The simple present tense is often used with adverbs like sometimes, always, usually, every day, and never.

The simple present tense has two forms:

  1. The third-person singular (he, she, it). Examples: He jogs every
  2. The other form of the verb which does not end with s. This is used with plural subjects as well as pronouns like I, you, we, and they. Examples: They jog every

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “J.S.S 1: THIRD TERM LESSON NOTE/SCHEME OF WORK (ENGLISH LANGUAGE)”

Your email address will not be published.